DNS – An Introduction

Though you may not know it, DNS (Or Domain Name System) is probably the most used things on the Internet. In fact, you’re using it right now. For those who don’t know what DNS is or does, it is the system we use to translate Domain Names to IP Addresses.

The World Before DNS

Back in the early days of the Internet (And by early, I mean before it was even *called* the Internet), all of the computers that were connected to one another could only be reached by using a series of numbers.…

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Hardening Microsoft Solutions from Attacks

Take a minute to go over this post from Dirk-jan Mollema. Go ahead and read it. I’ll wait…

Did you realize how scary that kind of attack is? As an IT guy who specializes in Exchange server and loves studying security, that article scared the snot out of me. Based on my experience with organizations of all sizes I can say with a good bit of authority that almost every Exchange organization out there is probably vulnerable to this attack.…

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Enabling Message Encryption in Office 365

As I mentioned in an earlier post, email encryption is a sticky thing. In a perfect world, everyone would have Opportunistic TLS enabled and all mail traffic would be automatically encrypted with STARTTLS encryption, which is a fantastic method of ensuring security of messages “in transit”. But some messages need to be encrypted “at rest” due to security policies or regulations.…

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Designing Infrastructure High Availability

IT people, for some reason, seem to have an affinity towards designing solutions that use “cool” features, even when those features aren’t really necessary. This tendency sometimes leads to good solutions, but a lot of times it ends up creating solutions that fall short of requirements or leave IT infrastructure with significant short-comings in any number of areas.…

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If You Have a Cisco Firewall, Disable this Feature NOW!!!

I don’t often have an opportunity to post a rant in an IT blog (And even less opportunity to create a click-bait headline), but here goes nothing! Cisco’s method of doing ESMTP packet inspection is INCREDIBLY STUPID and you should disable it immediately. Why do I say that? Because when Cisco ASAs/whatever they call them these days are configured to perform packet inspection on ESMTP traffic, the preferred option of doing so is to block the STARTTLS verb entirely.*

In other words, Cisco firewalls are designed to completely disable email encryption in order to inspect email traffic.…

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Protect Yourself from the WannaCry(pt) Ransomware

Well, this has been an exciting weekend for IT guys around the world. Two IT Security folks can say that they saved the world and a lot of people in IT had no weekend. The attack was shut down before it encrypted the world, but there’s a good chance the attack will just be changed and start over.…

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A Treatise on Information Security

One famous misquote of American Founding Father Ben Franklin goes like this, “Anyone who would sacrifice freedom for security deserves neither.” At first glance, this statement speaks to the heart of people who have spent hours waiting in line at the airport, waiting for a TSA agent to finish groping a 90 year old lady in a wheel chair so they can take off their shoes and be guided into a glass tube to be bombarded with the emissions of a full body scanner.…

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Disabling Direct Access Forced Tunneling

So you’re trying to get Direct Access (DA) running in your environment and you suddenly realized that your test machine can no longer access…anything. Well, this may be due to the “accidental” enabling of “Forced Tunneling” in your DA configuration. How do you fix it? You can pretty easily reconfigure your DA configuration to disable Forced Tunneling, but unless your test machine is directly connected to your AD environment, you’ll never be able to get the Group Policy updates on your test machine.…

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Anatomy of a Certificate Error

The most important step in diagnosing a specific security error involves determining what the error is telling you. There are a few things that can cause certificate errors, and what you do depends entirely on what is causing the error to begin with. Once you know what the error is telling you, it becomes much easier to figure out what you need to do next.…

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Theory: Understanding Digital Certificates

One of the more annoying tasks in administering a publicly available website that uses HTTPS (Outlook Web App, for example) is certificate generation and installation. Anyone who has ordered a certificate from a major Certificate Authority (CA) like Godaddy or Network Solutions has dealt with the process. It goes something like this:

  1. Generate a Certificate Signing Request (CSR) on the web server
  2. Upload the CSR to a CA in a Certificate Request
  3. Wait for the CA to respond to your Request with a set of files
  4. Download the “Response” files
  5. Import the files on the Web Server

Once that gets done, you will (usually) have a valid certificate that allows the server to use SSL or TLS to encrypt communications with client machines.…

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