Data Encryption – How it Works (Part 1)


I’ve decided to start a short series of posts on data encryption, which is becoming an increasingly important subject in IT as government regulations and privacy concerns demand ever increasing levels of privacy and security.

In this series, I’ll try to cover the more confusing concepts in encryption, including the three main types of encryption systems used today; Private Key encryption, Public Key Encryption, and SSL/TLS encryption.…

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Designing Infrastructure High Availability

IT people, for some reason, seem to have an affinity towards designing solutions that use “cool” features, even when those features aren’t really necessary. This tendency sometimes leads to good solutions, but a lot of times it ends up creating solutions that fall short of requirements or leave IT infrastructure with significant short-comings in any number of areas.…

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If You Have a Cisco Firewall, Disable this Feature NOW!!!

I don’t often have an opportunity to post a rant in an IT blog (And even less opportunity to create a click-bait headline), but here goes nothing! Cisco’s method of doing ESMTP packet inspection is INCREDIBLY STUPID and you should disable it immediately. Why do I say that? Because when Cisco ASAs/whatever they call them these days are configured to perform packet inspection on ESMTP traffic, the preferred option of doing so is to block the STARTTLS verb entirely.*

In other words, Cisco firewalls are designed to completely disable email encryption in order to inspect email traffic.…

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Protect Yourself from the WannaCry(pt) Ransomware

Well, this has been an exciting weekend for IT guys around the world. Two IT Security folks can say that they saved the world and a lot of people in IT had no weekend. The attack was shut down before it encrypted the world, but there’s a good chance the attack will just be changed and start over.…

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Resolving the Internal and External DNS zone Dilemma with Pinpoint DNS

Here’s an interesting trick that might help you resolve some of your DNS management woes, particularly if you have a different Public and Private DNS zone in your environment. For instance, you have a domain name of whatever.com externally, but use whatever.local internally. When your DNS is set up like that, all attempts to access systems using the whatever.com domain name will default to using the external, Public IP addresses assigned in that DNS zone.…

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ADFS or Password Sync: Which one do you use?

I’ve run into a number of people who get confused about this subject when trying to determine how to get their On-Prem accounts and Office 365 synced and working properly. Most often, people are making a comment somewhere that says, “Just use Password sync, it’s just as good and doesn’t require a server,” or something similar.…

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Do I need Anonymous Relay?

Problems

If you have managed an Exchange server in the past, you’ve probably been required to set things up to allow printers, applications, and other devices the ability to send email through the Exchange server. Most often, the solution to this request is to configure an Anonymous Open Relay connector. The first article I ever wrote on this blog was on that very subject: http://wp.me/pUCB5-b . …

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What is a DNS SRV record?

If you’ve had to work with Active Directory or Exchange, there’s a good chance you’ve come across a feature of DNS called a SRV record. SRV records are an extremely important part of Active Directory (They are, in fact, the foundation of AD) and an optional part of Exchange Autodiscover. There are a lot of other applications that use SRV records to some degree or another (Lync/Skype for Business relies heavily on them, for instance).The question, though, is why SRV records are so important and what exactly do they do?…

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A Treatise on Information Security

One famous misquote of American Founding Father Ben Franklin goes like this, “Anyone who would sacrifice freedom for security deserves neither.” At first glance, this statement speaks to the heart of people who have spent hours waiting in line at the airport, waiting for a TSA agent to finish groping a 90 year old lady in a wheel chair so they can take off their shoes and be guided into a glass tube to be bombarded with the emissions of a full body scanner.…

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Disabling Direct Access Forced Tunneling

So you’re trying to get Direct Access (DA) running in your environment and you suddenly realized that your test machine can no longer access…anything. Well, this may be due to the “accidental” enabling of “Forced Tunneling” in your DA configuration. How do you fix it? You can pretty easily reconfigure your DA configuration to disable Forced Tunneling, but unless your test machine is directly connected to your AD environment, you’ll never be able to get the Group Policy updates on your test machine.…

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